bone loss

Protective effect of low-dose risedronate against osteocyte apoptosis and bone loss in ovariectomized rats

Osteocyte apoptosis is the first reaction to estrogen depletion, thereby stimulating osteoclastic bone resorption resulting in bone loss. We investigated the effects of two different risedronate (RIS) doses (high and low) on osteocyte apoptosis, osteoclast activity and bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

Reproduction Differentially Affects Trabecular Bone Depending on Its Mechanical Versus Metabolic Role

During pregnancy and lactation, the maternal skeleton provides calcium for fetal/infant growth, resulting in substantial bone loss, which partially recovers after weaning. However, the amount of bone that is lost and the extent of post-weaning recovery are highly variable among different skeletal sites, and, despite persistent alterations in bone structure at some locations, reproductive history does not increase postmenopausal fracture risk.

Role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in inflammatory bone loss

TNF-α plays a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bone loss. Unfortunately, treatment of RA with anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids (GCs) also causes bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a mediator of GC’s anti-inflammatory effect, can enhance osteogenic differentiation in vitro and bone acquisition in vivo.

The CRH-Transgenic Cushingoid Mouse Is a Model of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

Glucocorticoids (GCs) have unparalleled anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, which accounts for their widespread prescription and use. Unfortunately, a limitation to GC therapy is a wide range of negative side effects including Cushing's syndrome, a disease characterized by metabolic abnormalities including muscle wasting and osteoporosis. GC-induced osteoporosis occurs in 30% to 50% of patients on GC therapy and thus, represents an important area of study.

A multi-method assessment of bone maintenance and loss in an Imperial Roman population: Implications for future studies of age-related bone loss in the past

One of the hallmarks of contemporary osteoporosis and bone loss is dramatically higher prevalence of loss and fragility in females post-menopause. In contrast, bioarchaeological studies of bone loss have found a greater diversity of age- and sex-related patterns of bone loss in past populations. We argue that the differing findings may relate to the fact that most studies use only a single methodology to quantify bone loss and do not account for the heterogeneity and complexity of bone maintenance across the skeleton and over the life course.

Suppression of Sclerostin Alleviates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Protecting Bone Forming Cells and Their Progenitors through Distinct Mechanisms

Focal radiotherapy is frequently associated with skeletal damage within the radiation field. Our previous in vitro study showed that activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway can overcome radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis of osteoblastic cells. Neutralization of circulating Sclerostin with a monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) is an innovative approach for treating osteoporosis by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in bone.