Multiple roles for CCR2 during fracture healing

Authors

Xing, Z. and Lu, C. and Hu, D. and Yu, Y. and Wang, X. and Colnot, C. and Nakamura, M. and Wu, Y. and Miclau, T. and Marcucio, R.S.

Abstract

Bone injury induces an inflammatory response that involves neutrophils, macrophages and other inflammatory cells. The recruitment of inflammatory Ccr2 transcripts and the filtration of macrophages into fracture calluses were most robust during the early phases of fracture healing. We then determined that the number of macrophages at the fracture site was significantly lower in Ccr2–/– mice compared with wild-type controls at 3 days injury. As a result, impaired vascularization, decreased formation of callus, and delayed maturation of cartilage were observed at 7 days after in mutant mice. At day 14, Ccr2–/– mice had less bone in their calluses. At day 21, Ccr2–/– mice had larger calluses and more bone compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a delayed remodeling. In addition, we examined the effect of Ccr2 mutation on osteoclasts. We found that a lack of Ccr2 did not affect the number of osteoclasts within fracture calluses at 21 days after injury. However, Ccr2–/– osteoclasts exhibited a decreased ability to resorb bone compared with wild-type cells, which could contribute to the delayed remodeling of fracture calluses observed in Ccr2–/– mice. Collectively, these results indicate that a deficiency of Ccr2 reduces the infiltration of macrophages and impairs the function of osteoclasts, leading to delayed fracture healing.

Link to Article

http://dmm.biologists.org/content/early/2010/03/25/dmm.003186.full.pdf